Treatment Of a Squamous Cell Carcinoma

Published in Middleburg Life

VETERINARIAN PRESENTS AT INTERNATIONAL MEETING

Leesburg veterinarian Dr. Jay Joyce of Total Equine Veterinary Associates recently lectured at the World Equine Veterinary Association’s meeting in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

“I am honored and pleased to have had the opportunity to represent the United States, and Northern Virginia, as a player in the international equine veterinary community, ” he said. “International exchange of knowledge and techniques will keep our Loudoun horses healthier and performing better for years to come.”
He spoke on the surgical removal of a large tumor from a horse and subsequent treatment with an injectable chemotherapy drug.

“I was very nervous, and I was apprehensive about international scrutiny – I really put myself out there,” Joyce said. “But it was incredible to be so well-received. There was a veterinarian from Turkey who hardly spoke English, yet he understood the technique and medications administered, and he is now taking what I recommended home to his country to help his horses, just as I have taken what I learned back to Loudoun. That’s cool!”

More than 2,000 veterinary delegates from around the world attended the event.

Below is the abstract from the presentation:

squamous cell carcinoma  

TREATMENT OF A LARGE VULVAR SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA BY RADICAL EXCISION AND INJECTABLE CISPLATIN

Introduction

A recently rescued 10-year-old paint mare was presented for treatment of a squamous cell carcinoma / perineal/vulvar mass. The current owner noted a 7.5 cm roundish mass growing from the left vulva 3 months prior to examination. Since the first observation, the mass enlarged from 7.5 cm to approximately 20 cm and became multilobulated.

Description of the Case

On presentation, the patient was profoundly anemic (PCV 11) with leukocytosis (WBC 15,500). Expecting significant blood loss at excision, antibiotic therapy and iron supplementation were initiated prior to surgery. After 7 days, PCV increased to 19 and WBC decreased to 9,900; but the tumor size grew approximately 25%. The mass had characteristics of a squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and was excised followed by intralesional injection of cisplatin. In addition to the tumor, the exposed region contained maggots, abscesses and necrotic tissue. During the next 4 months, a total of 240 mg of cisplatin in sesame oil was injected (approximately 50 mg every 2-3 weeks). Histopathology confirmed SCC. With radical excision and cisplatin treatment, the owner’s expectation of a comfortable and relatively normal outcome was realized. Discussion: SCC of the vulva is a common tumor in horses. It is treatable by the general practitioner, and the overall cost of medicines and procedures was not unreasonable for the average horse owner. Only 20% of SCC of the mucocutaneous junction are considered to metastasize which allows control of tumors with local therapy. Cisplatin is toxic and care must be taken to prevent exposure while mixing and administering the drug.

Conclusion

With radical excision and intralesional cisplatin, it was possible to reasonably control tumor growth and provide the patient with a favorable prognosis for life.

Treatment Of a Squamous Cell Carcinoma Reviewed by on . Published in Middleburg Life VETERINARIAN PRESENTS AT INTERNATIONAL MEETING Leesburg veterinarian Dr. Jay Joyce of Total Equine Veterinary Associates recently l Published in Middleburg Life VETERINARIAN PRESENTS AT INTERNATIONAL MEETING Leesburg veterinarian Dr. Jay Joyce of Total Equine Veterinary Associates recently l Rating: 0

Comments (1)

  • Kindsey

    You’ve hit the ball out the park! Inledribce!

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